Knee and Lower Limb Rehab Course – Online

How would this benefit?

  • Have you found yourself doing more impact exercise like running and finding your knees are sore?
  • Have you previously had physiotherapy for a knee problem and found your knee is now stiffening up or becoming more achy?
  • Have you had previous knee surgery and were following a physiotherapy rehabilitation program but now found you are not doing enough of the exercises?
  • Are you struggling to find the motivation to do the right exercises to keep you fit and active or unsure of what exercises you should be doing to keep both physically fit but also strong in the legs and core?

JOIN THE COURSE HERE

Link above will take you to our booking software at Bodies Under Construction.

Here’s a great story about a patient of ours.

Meet Lucy….she was previously having regular Physio treatment for post-op knee surgery and was progressing well and had returned to running. She was really compliant with her Physio exercises and disciplined with her weekly exercise program so she was feeling her knee was really improving. And then Corona happened……and her knee started to grumble.

Why?

She admitted she wasn’t as compliant as she had been with her rehab exercises so she wasn’t doing enough lower limb strength, flexibility or core work and had substituted her limited time for going running – She was struggling for enough time between managing her kid’s home schooling and trying to hold down her own job –  so the meant more impact loading on the knee and less rehab exercise and that was the reason her knee was starting to flare up.

Does this sound like you?

Well you are certainly not alone and if you make the right step now and get in touch with us we can help – we can offer you specific lower limb core and conditioning exercise classes and one to one online video physio consultations.

We will be starting a four week lower limb conditioning and core program and each week there will be a specific emphasis on one the four “foundation pillars” –

FLEXIBILITY

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING

BALANCE AND CORE STABILITY

CARDIOVASCULAR FITNESS

Week 1 – Flexibility

This week will focus on dynamic and static stretching for not only the lower limb and but also the hip, pelvis and lower spine and will include key tips and advice on how to use a foam roller and spiky ball to enhance the soft tissue release effect in your muscle system

Week 2 – Strength and Conditioning

This week the emphasis will be on the most effective exercises for strengthening the key lower limb muscles and also the hip and pelvis – all key parts of what we call the “Kinetic Chain” Any weakness in the any part of the kinetic chain can result in increased loading and potential injur to the knee complex.

Week 3 – Balance and Core Stability

Balance is a key pillars that often gets over looked with more of an emphasis often placed on other rehab goals –well not anymore! We will separate fact from fiction and teach you both the key balance and core exercises that are both safe for your spine and most effective for engaging your core muscles and for improving your proprioceptive (balance) system. Improving both your balance and your core together will help with preventing any low limb and lower back muscle strains and fatigue and also will help with your balance and control especially with impact exercise such as running.

Week 4 – Cardiovascular Fitness

This week we are going to get your heart rate pumping and the legs working hard! Feel that burn! We will focus on HIIT  – High intensity interval training exercises that you can do in your home with no gym equipment necessary and show you plenty of alternate effective exercises that can improve your cardiovascular fitness and whilst not overloading your knees

JOIN THE COURSE HERE

Link above will take you to our booking software at Bodies Under Construction. Investment £40.

If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your knee. Connect with us on 01344 489 398 or click here to fill out our contact form. Please enter your details and tell us what’s going on with your knee. A member of the team will be in touch.

Julie’s Story of HOPE (Severe *Back* Pain) – Helped Via Online Physio Consultation

As the “lock down” continues many people out there are still struggling with all kinds of aches and pains. There is good news and Physio help is via a Physio Telephone or Video Consultation. We have been getting a few emails this week from people asking for advice as they are now having to work from home for the first time. If you are anything like me, and maybe you don’t have the best posture when sitting at your make shift desk at the dining room table on a chair that is SOOO uncomfortable?!

One of our lovely patients, Julie, contacted us after spending the previous week sitting at her kitchen table working on her laptop, for 8 hours straight each day in virtual meetings and rarely getting up and out of her chair –  even for a coffee break!!!  She commented “isn’t this meant to be self isolation and not torture”

Julie has been experiencing  back “niggles” for a while and but had never done anything about them as she thought “it will be okay” and “its not stopping me from doing anything”!!  Well this came back to bite her in the bum – literally!!!  All week her back had been getting progressively worse, until she tried to get off the sofa on Friday night and her back “locked”. She thought the glass of wine she had been drinking would have helped it relax but it was not to be. 

After a painful and very restless sleep, she told me she struggled to get out of bed the next day. So much so, her husband had to help her get dressed and make sure she got down the stairs safely!.  Painkillers weren’t touching it, she was struggling to stand up straight and was having pain deep into her bum cheek. Sitting down was a mission and so uncomfortable, that she was in tears at points as she was unable to find a position that the pain would go away.

Julie emailed me late on Friday night as not only was she in pain but she was fearful that there would be no help for her as the clinic was closed.  I suggested that we jump on a video chat on Saturday morning.  She was sceptical on how this would work if I couldn’t get my hands on her.

We jumped on a video chat the next day and I could see not only the pain across her face, but the pure exhaustion from not having slept properly for the last two nights. I could quickly assess from watching her movements (or lack there of!) what was going on and we set about going through a series of movements that quickly helped ease the pain, and restored some movement! We then went through a series of stretches and release exercises to help relax the muscles and to get the joints moving better.

After the session, Julie was able to sit and stand up straight, still has some discomfort but she had exercises to help her until our next session. Something that did really strike me, she said “I didn’t know you could help so much without even touching me! I thought I would be like this until the clinic opened again and I don’t know how I would have coped”. 

= = = =

What you’ve just read is a *pretty extreme* case of back pain.

And often occurs due to “procrastination” (putting off going to see the right people…)…but in addition at this time, most people just assume that nothing can be done unless they physically go and see someone.

Chances are that your back pain and restrictions in life are no where near as bad as Julie’s (yet) – and your transformation will be even easier for us to achieve for you, and will happen much sooner.

There are so many things we can do and treat without using “hands on” therapy. So if you feel like you need help with anything, or if you want advice on how to stay fit and healthy, and let’s face it sane in this crazy time, we are here to help! 

If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your back pain. We have a free back pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 (Bracknell) , 01753 866274 (Windsor) or email us on windsor@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. A member of the team can take your details and we can email or post you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio and Bodies Under Construction team


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Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio and Bodies Under Construction Clinics situated in Bracknell, Chiswick, Putney and Windsor. Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practices for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, who want to keep healthy and active.

Windsor Pilates Studio Open Day Sat 23rd November 10-2pm

We have limited FREE spaces for reformer and tower sessions. We also have a few spaces available for a small equipment Mat class.

Spots will go very quickly so call us on 01753 866 274 and secure your space now!

Click here to submit your info on our contact page:

At Apple Physiotherapy we are super proud to be one of the only studios in the area to offer such small and exclusive classes. Our Exclusive Reformer / Tower Classes will never have more than 4 people – this enables the instructor to modify and tailor each exercise to suit the individual participants whilst enjoying exercise in a small group environment safely.

In addition to our new Reformer/Tower Studio and our mat studio we have a wonderful new Private and Semi-Private equipment studio.

Our highly skilled and experienced Pilates Team will empower you through your movement journey at one of our many studios.  In our friendly studio atmosphere you will be supported and encouraged to find and achieve your own goals.

We see the multidisciplinary benefits of Pilates and passionately endorse Pilates for rehabilitation, mental wellbeing and fitness purposes.  Here at Apple we are very proud to be able to offer various options to suit all levels.

We also offer 121 sessions, Duet classes, and Mat Pilates.  Whether it’s Pilates group classes or using the fitness equipment… working out as buddies or a small group will bring everyone faster results! Attain stronger, defined, healthier and confident bodies.

Our 121 sessions are an amazing introduction to the wonderful world of Pilates and are great for those who might feel nervous about exercising in a group environment.

Our Mat classes only consist of a maximum of 8 people.  This allows our instructor to get hands on with each participant which ensure you get maximum benefit for each individual session.

Our studios at both Bracknell and Windsor offer a wide range of equipment including the Cadillac, Ladder Barrel The Wunda Chair and Reformer.

Are you in???

Below is our timetable – why not get in touch to enquire about our prices and the great value packages that we have on offer.

Click here to submit your info on our contact page:

Sports Injury Focus – Shin Splints

Signs and Symptoms:

Pain on the inside of the shin bone – usually appears gradually and gets worse the more running or waking on a hard surface that you do. Excessive walking in poor fitting shoes ( like flip flops) can sometimes also lead to shin splints.

* Week 1 

Complete rest is advised for the athlete.
Speak to the GP about anti-inflammatories and apply ice regularly to the damaged shinbone.

In this phase it’s important to check trainers for “wear” and loss of support. Also, consider custom orthotics that are proven to reduce the effects of shin splints and limit pain during exercise.

Athlete can cycle, swim, cross trainer and rowing machine to maintain CV fitness. Running is to be avoided at all costs.

From a Physio point of view – deep massage of the calf and Achilles muscles is urgent as is stretching of both. Sometimes strapping can be of help. Consider dry needling as a treatment modality as well.

* Week 2 

Continue with ice and rest from cycling or running. 

Swimming is encouraged and the rower is also possible and unlikely to reproduce any pain in the shin. If it does, stop. 

Continue with gluteal and core exercises and stretching in the gym. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the whole leg is vital and will continue x3 daily, immediately followed by passive and active stretching. 

* Week 3 

Consider gradual return to running. Note: Treadmill running is advised first due to less impact. All other fitness options are continued and core/pilates is increased.

From a Physio point of view – athlete continues to receive deep tissue massage, PNF stretching and hands on work to the leg and also the lower back region as a prophylaxis.

* Week 4 

Continue with ice.

Insert custom orthotics and begin gradual return to pre-injury activity.

Athlete will continue to apply ice immediately after any running for at least 6 weeks.

Core and pilates exercises maintained, as is all strength and flexibility work to the surrounding muscle groups.

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the calf muscle and surrounding muscles continues for approximately 2-3 weeks.

Review of recovery: 

Complete rest from running needed early on.

Stretch and massaging of calf and Achilles is pivotal to the successful recovery. As is doing the right core, Pilates and gluteal strength and control exercises.

Secret Tip(s): 

Check your trainers and change them every 3 months, consider custom foot orthotics and ice packs is the best thing that you can be doing to help your self with shin splints.

You must also be doing regular core control and back strength exercises, too. Let your Physio do everything else.

Do not be fooled by the absence of pain when you rest. Shin Splints are likely to only be painful in a weight-bearing situation (such as running or excessive walking).

Note: Return to running progressively and start with treadmill –> grass –> sand –> road.

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


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Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus – Runners’ Knee ( ITB Friction Syndrome)

Signs and Symptoms:

Signs & Symptoms of Runners’ Knee include burning sensation/pain that comes on gradually on the outside of the knee. Common in cyclists and runners. Often confusing as there is no major incident or trauma, yet the pain and or burning comes on gradually and appears to get worse. 

* Week 1 

Ice is vital. As is rest. 

Walking is fine and swimming is great too. With this kind of injury, maintaining flexibility and core strength, is important. 

From a Physio point of view – I’d be working on deep tissue massage of the tensioners of the IT Band(The muscles at the top of the hip) as well as stretching the band, quads and hip region. 

It’s also possible that the Athlete’s “back” will have stiffened so I’d be working to loosen that area too. It’s really important for the Athlete to be working on strength work of the Gluteal muscles and the core stability muscles. 

* Week 2 

Continue with ice and rest from cycling or running. 

Swimming is encouraged and the rower is also possible and unlikely to reproduce any pain on the out-side of the band. If it does, stop. 

Continue with gluteal and core exercises and stretching in the gym. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the whole leg is vital and will continue x3 daily, immediately followed by passive and active stretching. 

* Week 3 

Cycling and or running will be able to be introduced in this phase, providing the athlete has followed the treatment plan noted above. 

Gentle, half pace jogging is introduced and cycling (both on the flat). Athlete should not be expecting to feel any burning sensation. Fatigue and stiffness is okay. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage continues as does stretching. Increase gluteal and core exercise and begin re-introduction to 3/4 level activity and or practice. Ice remains important after every session (use heat before). 

* Week 4 

Athlete steps up to training. Sneakers are checked and or orthotics applied to footwear to re-correct the position of the foot. 

From a Physio point of view – massage and stretching continue for at least 2-3 weeks and athlete continues working on core stability and gluteal strength and control exercises. More functional baed exercises are included as well as good hip and knee control against gravity.

Review of recovery: 

Complete rest needed early on – just until the pain settles

Stretch and massaging is pivotal to the successful recovery. As is doing the right core, gluteal exercises and functional rehab exercises. Most times the issues are related to biomechanics and this must be corrected or you’ll just be putting a band aid on the problem.

Secret Tip(s): 

Check your sneakers and change them every 3 months, consider custom foot orthotics and ice packs are the best thing that you can be doing to help your self.  Remember your compliance with your home exercises!

Let your Physiotherapist do everything else. 

Do not be fooled by the absence of pain when you rest. The IT Band is only painful in a weight-bearing situation (such as running) or cycling due to excessive over use. 

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus: Knee Ligament

Signs and symptoms: 

Athlete likely to have landed awkwardly, twisted, or fallen causing pain, stiffness and immediate swelling of the knee joint, often on the inside. 

* Week 1 

Immediate ice, compression and elevation of the injured knee. Begin gentle walking ASAP. Strapping

Often 3-4 days post injury. 

Note: it is expected (and okay) to be painful. However, straight line walking only. 

None whatsoever twisting or turning of the knee joint can be tolerated in week 1. 

Swimming is encouraged when possible and if pain allows (Tip: Athletes will often use a float between the legs to keep the knee straight and limit pain). 

From a Physio point of view – deep friction massage and very gentle stretching and massage would begin after just 4-5 days. 

* Week 2 

Very gentle (but prolonged) walking on the flat is vital and is to be encouraged. Towards the end of week 2, the goal will be for gentle jogging on a treadmill. 

Swimming continues (not breast stroke), cycling and cross trainers are all ok. 

From a Physio point of view – massage continues of damaged knee ligaments and of the quads, ham- string and calf muscles. Specific quad and gluteal muscle activation is essential

Stretching of all muscle groups is a must and balance work is now added for both legs. 

* Week 3 

Exercise and CV work is increased. 

Straight line running is picked up and the athlete will aim to be at three quarter pace by the end of this phase. 

Slowly, but surely, uneven surfaces are introduced and twisting and turning begins to be allowed. 

From a Physio point of view – all deep massage work continues, muscles and knee joint are stretched to max and proprioception exercises are now top priority along with full movement of the knee joint. 

* Week 4 

Athlete returns to training and possibly performance. CV work increase and continues. 

From a Physio point of view – all massage treatment and stretching continues for approximately 3-4 weeks and athlete pays attention to strength and proprioception exercises. 

Review of recovery: 

Take it very easy early on. But in the case of nearly all knee ligament sprains, too much rest will be harmful. 

Stretch and mobilise the injury at just the right time and no knee ligament injury can ever recover fully with prolonged rest. 

Secret Tip(s): 

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood of re-injury and a recovery plateau will occur. 

No breast stroke in the swimming pool. 

Do not be fooled by lack of pain when walking straight – twisting and turning “pain free” must be achievable. 

Note: It’s not uncommon for knee sprains to feel not much better even 6 weeks down the line. And it’s often because of too much rest in the first few weeks. 

Stay off the beach and avoid uneven woods/hilly areas when running, for at least 3 months post knee injury. 

Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks either. 

It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed all of the Protocol listed above, you will damage the ligament again sometime soon – often when you least expect it on an uneven surface.

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus- Ankle Sprains

We’ve seen lots of people with ankle injuries over the years. The common story we hear when clients come in, is that they have sprained the ankle ages ago and started to notice pain in the knee, hip or back on the same side as the ankle injury. There is always a knock on effect, and what most people don’t realise is lack of range of ankle movement( particularly what we call dorsiflexion) and loss of balance and strength and control at the ankle are the number one reasons why these problems persist.

Most people rest, take painkillers, wear a support and just assume that when the pain goes that the foot and ankle has fully recovered. Read on to get the correct information about how to properly manage a foot and ankle injury….

Ankle Sprains – Signs and symptoms:

Likely to have landed awkwardly, twisted, or fallen causing pain, stiffness and immediate swelling, mainly on the outside of the ankle joint, below the ankle bone. A ball of swelling will be noted or tracking of bruising down the lateral border of the foot. This is what we call ecchymosis. In my experience the worse this is my more likelihood you have a more serious ligament injury or a fracture. Injuries are classed in different grades, and upon diagnosis we will advise you to either wear a brace, get some crutches to offload the area, or we may advise an x-ray to exclude any bony injuries.

Please be mindful that the info below is a very basic guide. Please consult a health professional in order to get a proper idea of the severity of your injury before proceeding with anything we have provided below.

* Week 1 

We use the regime called P.O.L.I.C.E. Protection, Optimum Load, Immediate ice, compression and elevation. Strapping the joint will also help.

Begin gentle walking ASAP. Often 3-4 days post injury. Note it is expected (and okay) to be painful. However, straight line walking only.

None whatsoever twisting or turning of the ankle joint can be tolerated in week 1. Swimming is encouraged when possible and if pain allows.

From a Physio point of view – deep friction massage and very gentle massage of calf and Achilles would begin after just 4-5 days. We also use ultrasound and interferential at this stage. Strapping can also help.

* Week 2 

Very gentle (but prolonged) walking on the flat, is vital and to be encouraged. Towards the end of week 2, the goal will be for gentle jogging on a treadmill.

Swimming continues, cycling and cross trainers are all ok.

From a Physio point of view – massage continues of ankle ligaments and of the calf and Achilles tendon to prevent tightness and future problems. Stretching of all muscle groups is a must and balance work is now added to both ankles. Ankle mobility is important too.

* Week 3 

Exercise and CV work is increased.

Straight line running is picked up and athlete will aim to be at three quarter pace by the end of this phase.

Slowly, but surely, uneven surfaces are introduced and twisting and turning begins to be allowed.

From a Physio point of view – all deep massage work continues, muscles and ankle joint are stretched to the max and proprioception exercises are now top priority along with full movement of the ankle joint.

* Week 4 

Athlete returns to training and possibly performance. CV work increase and continues.

From a Physio point of view – all treatment and stretching continues for approximately 3-4 weeks and athlete pays attention to proprioception exercises. Lots and lots of balance work. We will also have a look higher up the chain and make sure that the calf muscles, hamstrings, gluteals and quads are doing what they should be doing.

Review of recovery: 

Take it very easy early on. But in the case of nearly all ankle sprains, too much rest will be harmful.

Stretch and mobilize the injury at just the right time and no ankle injury can ever fully recover with prolonged rest.

Secret Tip(s): 

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood of re-injury and a plateau. Do not be fooled by lack of pain when walking straight – Twisting and turning “pain free” must be achievable.

Note: It’s not uncommon for ankle sprains to feel not much better even 6 weeks down the line. And it’s often because of too much rest in the first few weeks.

Stay off the beach and avoid uneven woods/hilly areas when running, for at least 3 months post-injury. Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks either.

It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed all of the Protocols listed above, you will damage the ligament again sometime soon.

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus – Achilles Tendon Problems

Here at Apple Physio, we have worked with people with achilles issues for many years and truly have a great knowledge of how to diagnose and manage this issue. We see people with minor strains to complete rupture, and the recovery plans and treatment process varies. 

Truth is, without knowing you or your medical history intimately, I cannot tell you which of these will work best for you. And even if I did know the root cause of your sports injury, there are no guarantees that any one single strategy will work. As a disclaimer please do seek professional help and get a proper assessment of your injury.

Achilles Injury – Signs and symptoms: 

Immediate sharp pain in the back and bottom of your leg. Right above the ankle joint. Often happens when running or jumping and gets worse/comes on gradually as you run.  Sometimes this can build up over a period of time and is aggravated by movement, especially walking up hill or stairs. Calms down with rest and sometimes you can feel crepitus ( creaking) of the tendon.

* Week 1 

Complete rest. 

Apply lots of ice. Swap footwear to soft, comfy, high-heeled shoes. No need for strapping or supports other than to apply ice. 

Every hour for 10 minutes is recommend. 

Typically, a pro athlete suffering with an Achilles tendon issue would be advised to go swimming, take one or two gentle walks (on the flat) and when possible, work on core stability exercises with a balance ball. 

The right selection of footwear is important – avoid plimsoles or sandals. Find and wear a pair of trainers with a nice thick “heel” to prevent any tension on the tendon. 

From a Physio point of view – after about days 2-3, I’d begin some deep massage and very gentle stretching and work on the ankle joint to prevent any stiffness or get rid of any swelling. 

I’d also massage the calf muscle and check the lower back for any stiffness to rule out any nerve problems that could create more long-term problems. 

* Week 2 

Ice continues – often until day 10 depending upon how much bleeding has taken place and how badly damaged the muscle tear is. 

Typically, one of my players would now be exercising on a bike, swimming would continue and towards the end of week 2, I’d be aiming to have the athlete doing some very gentle jogging. 

The player or athlete can expect to feel some form of burning sensation, but as long as it isn’t “cramping” or “biting” this is fine – and a good thing. 

From a Physio point of view – massage is now vital.
It’s now that the scar tissue build up is “dangerous” and if the massage isn’t done, it’s the number 1 reason for an Achilles tearing again in the first two weeks back to running or playing. 

* Week 3 

Ice has stopped. Now, heat is being used rather than ice in this stage. 

Stretching is now vital. I’d be recommending the athlete to attend Yoga classes, increase the amount of Pilates exercises and that he or she be working on their balance (using a ball). 

Fitness levels are increased significantly. Swimming, cycling, gentle jogging is stepped up (still on the flat). And by the end of this phase, the athlete may or may not be asked to be doing three quarter pace running by now. 

From a Physio point of view – hands-on treatment is vital, massage continues and work on the Achilles, calf, hamstrings, gluteal muscles and lower back is essential to prevent future reoccurrence. 

Ankle joint and balance work is important too. PNF stretching is also introduced. Static, Isometric exercises to the calf and achilles tendon is initiated.

* Week 4 

Athlete 90% fit. 

CV work increases and a return to practice and full drills are possible and the goal, by the end of week 4. 

Athlete is put through drills that will include sprints, shuttles and plyometric work, including running backwards. 

Note: Hill running and sand is disqualified for at least 3 more months for this type of injury.


From a Physio point of view – hands-on massage continues, PNF stretching is vital and passive and active eccentric stretching and strength work is stepped up. 

* Week 5 

Athlete returns to sport.
Fitness and performance work increases. 

From a Physio point of view – massage continues to prevent scar tissue build up and stretching is continued before, during and after training sessions. 

Note: Daily hands-on massage will be needed for approximately another 2-3 weeks to prevent scar tissue (collagen) tightening the muscles. 

*Week 6

Review Of Recovery: 

Take it very easy early on, stretch and mobilize the injury at just the right time and no Achilies injury can every recover fully without deep massage or the right amount of rehabilitative work. Especially strength starting with static/isometric to a more dynamic eccentric type exercise.

*Week 7

Secret Tip(s): 

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood on re-injury. 

Stay off the beach when running for at least 3 months post injury. 

Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks either. It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed all of the protocol listed above, you will damage the tendon again sometime soon. If you are able to do plyometrics comfortably – i.e. run jump and push off the affected leg. Then you have a good chance of prevrnting the issue from returning again in future.

If you’d like to talk to an experienced Specialist Physio about the possibilities if you currently struggling with an Achilles problem and you decide for yourself that Physio will add value to your health, like it does so many other people, then please connect with us. 

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01753 866 274 or email us on windsor@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on.  A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus – Calf Muscle Injuries

The calf muscle. Muscle and achilles tendon issues. Pain on the side or front of the lower leg. We truly have a great knowledge of how to diagnose and manage this.  We see people with minor strains to complete muscle rupture, and the recovery plans and treatment process varies. The injuries (and the recovery plans) are in no particular order of importance and they all have one thing in common – they all work. There’s a great saying that goes: Small hinges swing big doors. And it’s often the simplest advice that wins in the end.

Truth is, without knowing you or your medical history intimately, I cannot tell you which of these will work best for you. And even if I did know the root cause of your sports injury, there are no guarantees that any one single strategy will work. As a disclaimer please do seek professional help and get a proper assessment of your injury.

Calf Injury – Signs and symptoms:

Immediate sharp pain in the muscle at the bottom of the leg, just below the knee. OR in the middle of the muscle belly. Often people describe the pain as having felt like they’d been “shot” in the back of the leg. These are injuries of a more acute nature. Some people describe a niggle that tends to get worse with activity and calms down when they not using the muscle. The persistent niggle is a little more difficult to deal with as there are many factors to consider. Training regime and biomechanics for example.

* Week 1

This is always about P.O.L.I.C.E Protection, Optimal Loading, Ice, Compression and Elevation
Ice is best applied little and often. 10 minutes every hour, should be enough.

Typically, a pro athlete would be advised to go swimming, take one or two gentle walks and when possible, work on core stability exercises with a balance ball.

The right selection of footwear is important – avoid plimsoles or sandals. Find and wear a pair of trainers with a nice thick heel to prevent any tension on the muscle.

From a Physio point of view – after about day 5, I’d begin some deep massage and very gentle stretching and work on the ankle joint to prevent any stiffness or get rid of any swelling.

* Week 2

Ice continues – often until day 10 depending upon how much bleeding has taken place and how badly damaged the muscle tear is.

Typically, one of my athletes would now be exercising on a bike and swimming would continue.

The athlete can expect to begin on a bike or start on the rowing machine to keep up with CV fitness but running should be avoided for now.

From a Physio point of view – deep massage is now vital. We’ll also review and correct biomechanics and start to work on improving ankle range of movement.

It’s now that the scar tissue build up is “dangerous” and if the deep massage isn’t done, it’s the number 1 reason for calf muscles tearing again in the first two weeks back to running or playing.

* Week 3

Ice has stopped. Now, heat is being used rather than ice in this stage.

Stretching is now vital. I’d be recommending the athlete to attend Yoga classes, increase the amount of Pilates exercises and that he or she be working on their balance (using a ball).

Fitness levels are increased significantly. Swimming, cycling, gentle jogging is stepped up. And by the end, the athlete may or may not be asked to be doing pace running by now.

From a Physio point of view – hands-on treatment is vital, massage continues and work on the Achilles, hamstrings, gluteal muscles and lower back is essential to prevent future reoccurrence.

PNF stretching is also introduced.

* Week 4

Athlete 90% fit. CV work increases and a return to practice and full drills is possible and the goal, by the end of week 4.

Athlete is put through drills that will include sprints, shuttles and plyometric work.

From a Physio point of view – hands-on massage continues, PNF stretching is vital and passive and active stretching is stepped up. We’ll also start to add in jumping and plyometrics.

* Week 5

Athlete returns to sport. Fitness and performance work increases.

From a Physio point of view– massage continues to prevent scar tissue build up and stretching is continued before, during and after training sessions.

Note: Hands-on massage will be need for approximately another 2-3 weeks to prevent scar tissue (collagen) tightening up the muscles.

Review of Recovery:

Take it very easy early on, stretch and mobilise the injury at just the right time and no calf injury can ever recover fully without deep massage, stretching and proper plyometric strength work.

Secret Tip:

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood of re-injury.

Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks either. It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed all of the protocol listed above, you will damage the muscle again sometime soon

If you’d like to talk to an experienced Specialist Physio about the possibilities if you currently struggling with a calf strain and you decide for yourself that Physio will add value to your health, like it does so many other people, then please connect with us.

If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your sports injury. Connect with us on 01344 489398 (Bracknell) , 01753 866274 (Windsor) or email us on windsor@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.



Sports Injury Focus – Hamstring and Groin Injury

Here at Apple Physio we have worked with people with Hamstring and Groin injuries for many years and truly have a great knowledge of how to diagnose and manage this issue. We see people with minor strains to complete rupture, and the recovery plans and treatment process varies. We may be able to diagnose the area of the strain via Physical Assessment or we may request you get a scan of the area to ascertain the severity or grade of the tear. The hamstring/groin is divided into 4-6 different muscles, so it is important to determine which muscle belly is affected.  The injuries (and the recovery plans) provided in the weeks below are in no particular order of importance and they all have one thing in common – they all work. There’s a great saying that goes: Small hinges swing big doors. And it’s often the simplest advice that wins in the end.

Signs and symptoms:

Immediate sharp pain in the back of the thigh or inner thigh. Often when sprinting, or a challenge that stretches the muscles of the hamstring or groin forcefully and it’s not uncommon for bruising and swelling to appear and sometimes track to behind and side of the knee. Can be very disabling in the first few days and very painful to walk.

Tip 1

This is always about Ice and rest. Compression. Not much else.

Typically, I’d advise an athlete to go swimming, take one or two gentle walks and when possible, work on core stability exercises with a balance ball.

From a Physio point of view – after about day 5 I’d begin some deep massage and very gentle stretching. It’s here where we’ll determine if you need some additional investigations and may refer you to get an ultrasound scan in order to confirm the severity of the injury. Sports Taping and compression(via a thigh support or tubigrip) may help as well. Be careful if you have a flight soon after an injury like this. Consult your doctor or speak to your Physiotherapist if you are unsure.

Tip 2

Ice continues – often up to day 10 depending upon how much bleeding has taken place and how badly damaged the muscle tear is.

Typically, an athlete would now be exercising on a bike, swimming would continue and towards the end of week 2, I’d be aiming to have the athlete doing some very gentle jogging. The player or athlete can expect to feel some form of burning sensation, but as long as it isn’t “cramping” or “biting” this is fine – and a good thing.

From a Physio point of view – massage is now vital. It’s now that the scar tissue builds up is “dangerous” and if the massage isn’t done, it’s the number 1 reason for hamstrings or groin muscles tearing again in the first two weeks back to running or playing. Massage will be applied as the athlete can tolerate. Flushing is the term we would use.

Tip 3

Ice has stopped. More heat is being used rather than ice in this stage.

Stretching is now vital. I’d be recommending the athlete to attend Yoga classes, increase the amount of Pilates exercises and that he or she be working on their balance (using an exercise/ gym ball). However, stretch to the point of tolerance being careful not to hurt the healing tissue further.

Fitness levels are increased significantly. Swimming, cycling, long distance running is stepped up. And the athlete may or may not be asked to be doing three quarter paces running by now.

From a Physio point of view – hands-on treatment is vital; massage continues and work on the gluteal muscles and lower back is essential to prevent future reoccurrence.

PNF stretching is also introduced. (This simply means a contract relax technique to increase tensile strength of the muscle fibre and also increased the range of movement. PNF stretching can also modulate pain.)

Tip 4

Athlete 90% fit. CV work increases and a return to practice and full drills is possible and the goal, by the end of week 4.

Athlete is put through drills that will include sprints, shuttles and plyometric work.

From a Physio point of view – hands-on massage continues, PNF stretching is vital and passive and active/functional stretching is stepped up. Isolated hamstring strength and inner thigh work is included through a good full range of movement.

Tip 5

Athlete returns to sport, fitness and performance work increases.

From a Physio point of view – massage continues to prevent scar tissue build up and stretching is continued before, during and after training sessions. Isolated hamstring strength work is included through a good full range of movement. Here we include my favourite – Nordic hamstring curls and the squashed frog and side lunge for the inner thighs. The aim to make the hamstring and groin even more robust and strong to prevent re-injury.

Note: Hands-on massage will be needed for approximately another 2-3 weeks to prevent scar tissue (collagen) tightening the muscles.

Review of recovery:

Take it very easy early on, stretch and mobilize the injury at just the right time and no hamstring or groin muscle can ever recover fully without deep massage, stretching and the right amount of strength work vs the functional activity requirements.

Secret Tip:

When jogging or running for the first time… a *burning* sensation is to be expected and is OKAY. There’s no need to stop. But you must stop if it cramps or feels as though the muscle is “biting” sharply…

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood of re-injury.

Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks. It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed the rules listed above, you will damage the muscle again sometime soon.

Conclusion:

Truth is, without knowing you or your medical history intimately, I cannot tell you which of these will work best for you or if your recovery will follow the plan above. And even if I did know the root cause of your sports injury, there are no guarantees that any one single strategy will work. As a disclaimer please do seek professional help and get a proper assessment of your injury in order to tailor your treatment plan.

But imagine this… how great it would be if you try just one of the strategies below every day…within a few weeks you could have gotten some way towards winning back your active, healthy “sporty” lifestyle.

If you’d like to talk to an experienced Specialist Physio about the possibilities if you currently struggling with a hamstring or groin strain and you decide for yourself that Physio will add value to your health, like it does so many other people, then please connect with us.

If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your sports injury. Connect with us on 01344 489398 (Bracknell) , 01753 866274 (Windsor) or email us on windsor@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, who want to keep healthy and active.