Sports Injury Focus – Runners’ Knee ( ITB Friction Syndrome)

Signs and Symptoms:

Signs & Symptoms of Runners’ Knee include burning sensation/pain that comes on gradually on the outside of the knee. Common in cyclists and runners. Often confusing as there is no major incident or trauma, yet the pain and or burning comes on gradually and appears to get worse. 

* Week 1 

Ice is vital. As is rest. 

Walking is fine and swimming is great too. With this kind of injury, maintaining flexibility and core strength, is important. 

From a Physio point of view – I’d be working on deep tissue massage of the tensioners of the IT Band(The muscles at the top of the hip) as well as stretching the band, quads and hip region. 

It’s also possible that the Athlete’s “back” will have stiffened so I’d be working to loosen that area too. It’s really important for the Athlete to be working on strength work of the Gluteal muscles and the core stability muscles. 

* Week 2 

Continue with ice and rest from cycling or running. 

Swimming is encouraged and the rower is also possible and unlikely to reproduce any pain on the out-side of the band. If it does, stop. 

Continue with gluteal and core exercises and stretching in the gym. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the whole leg is vital and will continue x3 daily, immediately followed by passive and active stretching. 

* Week 3 

Cycling and or running will be able to be introduced in this phase, providing the athlete has followed the treatment plan noted above. 

Gentle, half pace jogging is introduced and cycling (both on the flat). Athlete should not be expecting to feel any burning sensation. Fatigue and stiffness is okay. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage continues as does stretching. Increase gluteal and core exercise and begin re-introduction to 3/4 level activity and or practice. Ice remains important after every session (use heat before). 

* Week 4 

Athlete steps up to training. Sneakers are checked and or orthotics applied to footwear to re-correct the position of the foot. 

From a Physio point of view – massage and stretching continue for at least 2-3 weeks and athlete continues working on core stability and gluteal strength and control exercises. More functional baed exercises are included as well as good hip and knee control against gravity.

Review of recovery: 

Complete rest needed early on – just until the pain settles

Stretch and massaging is pivotal to the successful recovery. As is doing the right core, gluteal exercises and functional rehab exercises. Most times the issues are related to biomechanics and this must be corrected or you’ll just be putting a band aid on the problem.

Secret Tip(s): 

Check your sneakers and change them every 3 months, consider custom foot orthotics and ice packs are the best thing that you can be doing to help your self.  Remember your compliance with your home exercises!

Let your Physiotherapist do everything else. 

Do not be fooled by the absence of pain when you rest. The IT Band is only painful in a weight-bearing situation (such as running) or cycling due to excessive over use. 

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus: Knee Ligament

Signs and symptoms: 

Athlete likely to have landed awkwardly, twisted, or fallen causing pain, stiffness and immediate swelling of the knee joint, often on the inside. 

* Week 1 

Immediate ice, compression and elevation of the injured knee. Begin gentle walking ASAP. Strapping

Often 3-4 days post injury. 

Note: it is expected (and okay) to be painful. However, straight line walking only. 

None whatsoever twisting or turning of the knee joint can be tolerated in week 1. 

Swimming is encouraged when possible and if pain allows (Tip: Athletes will often use a float between the legs to keep the knee straight and limit pain). 

From a Physio point of view – deep friction massage and very gentle stretching and massage would begin after just 4-5 days. 

* Week 2 

Very gentle (but prolonged) walking on the flat is vital and is to be encouraged. Towards the end of week 2, the goal will be for gentle jogging on a treadmill. 

Swimming continues (not breast stroke), cycling and cross trainers are all ok. 

From a Physio point of view – massage continues of damaged knee ligaments and of the quads, ham- string and calf muscles. Specific quad and gluteal muscle activation is essential

Stretching of all muscle groups is a must and balance work is now added for both legs. 

* Week 3 

Exercise and CV work is increased. 

Straight line running is picked up and the athlete will aim to be at three quarter pace by the end of this phase. 

Slowly, but surely, uneven surfaces are introduced and twisting and turning begins to be allowed. 

From a Physio point of view – all deep massage work continues, muscles and knee joint are stretched to max and proprioception exercises are now top priority along with full movement of the knee joint. 

* Week 4 

Athlete returns to training and possibly performance. CV work increase and continues. 

From a Physio point of view – all massage treatment and stretching continues for approximately 3-4 weeks and athlete pays attention to strength and proprioception exercises. 

Review of recovery: 

Take it very easy early on. But in the case of nearly all knee ligament sprains, too much rest will be harmful. 

Stretch and mobilise the injury at just the right time and no knee ligament injury can ever recover fully with prolonged rest. 

Secret Tip(s): 

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood of re-injury and a recovery plateau will occur. 

No breast stroke in the swimming pool. 

Do not be fooled by lack of pain when walking straight – twisting and turning “pain free” must be achievable. 

Note: It’s not uncommon for knee sprains to feel not much better even 6 weeks down the line. And it’s often because of too much rest in the first few weeks. 

Stay off the beach and avoid uneven woods/hilly areas when running, for at least 3 months post knee injury. 

Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks either. 

It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed all of the Protocol listed above, you will damage the ligament again sometime soon – often when you least expect it on an uneven surface.

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

6 Shoe Mistakes That Could Be Causing Your Foot Pain

If you’ve ever hobbled off of the dance floor at a wedding with your heels in hand, or if you’ve ever found yourself looking forward to the moment you go home after a long day spent in meetings, so you can slip your new pair of suit shoes off – you’ll know shoes can easily cause foot pain.

This holds true for all types of footwear, not just the fancy kind…

Exercise shoes, office shoes, sandals, and that pair of weekend running around shoes we all have – they can all lead to painful feet too.

But before you throw out every pair of shoes in your wardrobe – let’s talk about your feet.

A lot of us are unaware of just how big of a role feet play when it comes to supporting your body.

Feet play the big job of supporting your body weight and take the impact of standing, walking, running and everything else you do throughout the day.

Your feet are made up of 52 bones, 66 joints and OVER 200 muscles, tendons AND ligaments – so when your feet don’t get the support they need, it’s no wonder why you can get issues!

A lack of support can also cause pain beyond your feet – your knees, back and other parts of your body begin to overcompensate, which can lead to pain in those areas too… not good.

With all of the above in mind – here are 6 shoe mistakes that cause foot pain, are you making any of them?

  1. You’re Unaware Of Your Arches

Generally speaking, there are two types of feet:

  1. High arched
  2. Low arched

And the demands for these two types are quite different!

For someone with high-arched feet – they have taller gaps on the soles of their feet.

For someone with low-arches – the curves between the balls of the foot and heels, are closer to the ground.

The curve of your shoe should support your arches so they can, in turn, support the rest of your feet and body. A good running shop, shoe shop, or even a Physio clinic with a special machine – can figure out what’s best for you.

We customise shoes for patients all the time, and the difference in their pain means they can get back to walking around comfortably and independently again.

  1. You Choose Your Running Shoes For Appearance

Have you ever bought a pair of running shoes because you think they look good? You’re not alone, many of us do, I’ve been guilty of it too!

But the truth is, picking the right performance shoe should be a strategic process.

When you need a new pair of trainers, go into a specialty running store and speak with a specialist. You need to consider things like the type of exercise you’ll be doing – running over 20 miles outdoors each week is VERY different from doing Pilates classes a couple of times a week.

A running analysis can do you the world of good too. We can do a GAIT analysis at both our clinics using a 2D and 3D video approach. Connect with us to find out more.

If you can afford to, have a couple of kinds of trainers for the workouts you do most often.

Wearing a tennis shoe for running, or a basketball shoe for weightlifting, can encourage injuries – choose wisely.

  1. You “Break In” Your New Pair Of Shoes

While it’s true that some shoes made of multiple materials, like hiking boots, might need some “breaking in” before you can get to the point where you feel like you’re walking on clouds – you should be careful not to rush the process.

Your shoes need to become accustomed to your feet over time to avoid pain and those nasty blisters that so often come with a new pair of shoes.

Instead of pushing through the pain – wear your shoes in a little at a time until they loosen naturally. Whether you’re doing this at home or while you’re out and about getting jobs done – keep a pair of socks and plasters handy to prevent blisters.

4. You Walk Around Barefoot At Home

As soon as you step through the door do you throw your shoes off and that’s you done for the day?

For a lot of us, taking our shoes off is one of the best feelings! But for some people, walking or standing barefoot on surfaces like hardwood floors, marble or tile puts stress on the structures of the feet either causing or making pain worse over time.

This can happen when the fleshy parts on your heels and balls of your feet which help cushion our bodyweight wear down.

If you have foot pain that feels worse when you walk around barefoot – get a pair of slippers to wear around the house to ease the pain.

Remember though that over time the best solution is to train yourself to walk around bare feet. It is actually better for you long term. But most of us in this modern day have become so accustomed to having something between our feet and the floor, some sort of support is thus required long term.

  1. You’re Still Wearing That Worn Down Pair Of Boots From 2014

Many of us only throw away a pair of shoes when they’re looking a bit worse for wear and worn down.

But once the sole of your shoe starts to break down, it changes the way your foot strikes the ground which can cause pain in your feet, hips, knees and back – this can also happen before your shoes start showing obvious signs it’s time for a brand new pair!

Depending on your activity level, it takes a few months to a year of daily use to wear out footwear.

If you really love a pair of shoes then re-soling them or adding an insert can help prolong their wear.

But don’t hold onto a pair of shoes too long before it’s too late!

  1. You Don’t Use Insoles

…Or understand their purpose.

Depending on your foot type and foot pain, you might already have the insoles that come with your shoes – however, they may not be right, or even supportive for you.

To ease the pain, stop it from getting worse or even to prevent it from coming on – it’s a smart idea to get yourself a pair of customised insoles (also known as Orthotics).

Rarely, however, are true custom orthotics available in many places, and most definitely not in shoe stores, in retail stores and even pharmacy’s.

Prescription Foot Orthotics ARE the most accurate custom functional foot orthotics and are made from non-weight bearing moulds of your feet (but you don’t need a note from your doctor to have one).

They also act to make activities such as running, walking – even standing – more efficient. What’s more, they can act to redistribute pressure on the bottom of the foot to relieve pain from excessive pressure or calluses.

The takeaway: Your feet are probably doing way more than you give them credit for, so they need shoes to match.

The right choices for you will depend on your activity levels, height, weight, walking and running style. But if you’re experiencing any kind of foot pain that lasts for days, it makes it almost impossible to live your life as normal.

If you’d like to talk to an experienced Specialist Physio about the possibilities if you currently struggling with foot and ankle pain and you decide for yourself that Physio will add value to your health, like it does so many other people, then please connect with us.

Here at Apple Physio all of our team have vast experience dealing with Foot and Ankle pan so if you need any advice please don’t hesitate to contact us.

If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your neck and shoulder. We have a free foot and ankle pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 (Bracknell) , 01753 866274 (Windsor) or email us on windsor@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. A member of the team can take your details and we can email or post you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, who want to keep healthy and active.

What is Patella Tendinopathy?

Patella tendinopathy, also known as jumper’s knee, is an overuse disorder characterised by pain at the base of the patella (kneecap) with activities such as squatting, sitting or going up and down stairs.

The condition is known as jumpers’ knee because it commonly affects athletes involved in sports that require jumping and repetitive loading of the patella tendon, such as basketball, volleyball, football and tennis.

Landing and jumping activities put a great amount of stress on the patella tendon. This tendon is responsible for transmitting the full force of the quadriceps muscles to the lower leg and during activities such as jumping and landing, this force can actually be many times more than your body weight.

What are the symptoms?

 The hallmark sign of patella tendinopathy is sharp, localised pain in the patella  tendon just below the base of the patella. The pain is usually aggravated by activities that increase load through the quadriceps muscles such as squatting and jumping or as simple as going up and down stairs.

Pain associated with patellar tendinopathy usually occurs gradually, often when a person has been very active for a long period of time or if they have recently increased their training schedule. The pain will often start as a small niggle, gradually becoming more noticeable and there may also be a feeling of stiffness with movements of the knee or first thing in the morning.

How does it happen?

Patella tendinopathy is not a traumatic condition rather, it usually develops gradually over time due to prolonged overloading of the tendon. Like other tissues in the body, tendons are dynamic and can adapt to be able to withstand more force with training. However, if a tendon is unable to adapt to increased load quickly enough, it can develop micro tears leading to pain and dysfunction, known as tendinopathy.

The risk of developing this condition can be increased by external factors, such as the type of sports chosen, training volume and the hardness of the training surface. I’ve also seen an increase in tendon problems in the knee when patients have had a systemic virus. Certain medications too can cause a transient decrease in tendon integrity and can put you at risk of injury.

Intrinsic factors such as bone structure, muscle length, diet, age, muscle strength and overall health can also affect the ability of a tendon to adapt to forces. Anything that impairs the tendon’s ability to absorb force can lead to the development of tendinopathy. In general, men are affected by this condition more often than women.

How can physiotherapy help?

As with all conditions, the first step to effective treatment is an accurate diagnosis. Your Physiotherapist will be able to correctly identify this condition and any factors that have led to its development.

Treatment for any tendinopathy will involve a degree of rest and re-evaluation of your training schedule. Treatment of the tendon itself has been shown to be most effective with a targeted exercise program involving isometric and eccentric muscle contractions. These types of movements have been shown to help stimulate healthy tendon tissue to increase strength and support the damaged tissue, ultimately reducing pain.

Tendinopathies can be notoriously difficult to resolve without patience and commitment to a rehabilitation program guided by a Physiotherapist.

If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your knee. We have a free knee pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489 398 or click here to fill out our contact form. Please enter your details and tell us what’s going on with your knee. A member of the team can email or post you a copy.

FREE REPORT: “HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET IN ON ALL THE FREE ADVICE CURRENTLY BEING GIVEN AWAY BY OUR BEST PHYSIOS TO PEOPLE WHO WANT TO KNOW HOW TO BRING A FAST END TO THEIR “DAILY, ANNOYING AND NAGGING” KNEE PAIN…BEFORE IT GETS ANY WORSE”!

…Meaning A Better Night’s Sleep, More Energy, Less Worry, And Above All…MORE Freedom To Do Things With LESS PAIN And Less Tension!… And That Would Be Nice, Right?

Yours Free From us here at Apple Physio……..

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, who want to keep healthy and active.

Is meniscus causing your knee pain?


What is a meniscus?

The meniscus is a cartilage structure which is found within the knee joint. This cartilage structure acts as a shock absorber between the thighbone and shinbone. This acts as a cushion to distribute load within the knee. Forces which are transferred through the knee increase exponentially as speeds of activity increases i.e running.

Occurrence 

An injury may occur to the meniscus due to twisting or direct impact. These injuries are common during sporting activities. A tear may happen when sudden twisting of the knee occurs while the foot is still planted on the ground. Pain and swelling will occur within 24 hours. Walking, bending or twisting of the knee with difficult and painful. There may be a locking sensation when bending or straightening the knee. Injury may also occur due to repetitive wear-and-tear (degenerative) injuries. 

Diagnosis 

A full battery of diagnosis tests will be completed to determine a meniscus injury. Patients may have tears which cause few problems, while others may have tears which cause pain affecting activities of their daily living. MRI may be used to evaluate ligaments and articular cartilage health. Treatment ranges from non-operative to surgical, depending on multiple factors. These factors include symptoms, health status, age, type and location of the tear. 

Intervention

Acute, traumatic tears, are typically treated surgically. The goal is to repair the meniscus structure. There are a variety of surgical techniques to do this. Meniscus repairs are completed as one day arthroscopic procedures( Key Hole Surgery). Patients are typically discharged on the same day of surgery. Physiotherapy begins immediately after this surgery. An unrestricted return to sports is usually achievable with Physiotherapy six months after surgery. However this may vary dependant on your particular injury

Rehab 

The first goal of Physiotherapy rehab is to decrease post-operative pain and swelling. Physiotherapy interventions will include manual and exercise-based therapies. Physiotherapy will aim to restore full range of movement and strength within the early stages of healing. Next Physiotherapy will work to restore strength, balance and proprioception. Late stage rehab will include dynamic exercises such as jumping and directional change movements. We aim to achieve mutually agreed rehab goals with a return to baseline function.

 If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your knee. We have a free knee pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489 398 or click here to fill out our contact form. Please enter your details and tell us what’s going on with your knee. A member of the team can email or post you a copy.

FREE REPORT: “HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET IN ON ALL THE FREE ADVICE CURRENTLY BEING GIVEN AWAY BY OUR BEST PHYSIOS TO PEOPLE WHO WANT TO KNOW HOW TO BRING A FAST END TO THEIR “DAILY, ANNOYING AND NAGGING” KNEE PAIN…BEFORE IT GETS ANY WORSE”!

…Meaning A Better Night’s Sleep, More Energy, Less Worry, And Above All…MORE Freedom To Do Things With LESS PAIN And Less Tension!… And That Would Be Nice, Right?

Yours Free From us here at Apple Physio……..


What is Runner’s Knee? (PFJ Syndrome)


Our knees are complex hinge joints, designed to provide stability from side to side and smooth movement forwards and back as you walk, kick and run. The patella, or kneecap, is a small bone embedded in the tendon of the quadriceps muscle that protects the knee and also provides extra leverage to the quadriceps, amplifying their strength. The patella moves up and down in a groove at the front of the knee as the knee bends and straightens. Usually this movement is smooth, with little friction, however, if something causes the patella to move in a dysfunctional way, the soft tissue between the kneecap and the knee can become irritated, causing pain in a typical pattern. This condition is often referred to as ‘runner’s knee’, PFJ Syndrome or patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS).

What causes it?

The patella usually sits in a balanced position in the shallow groove at the front of the knee and moves easily without friction. The patella is attached to the quadriceps muscle at the top and connected to the lower leg via the patella tendon at the bottom. When the quadriceps contracts, this pulls on the patella and acts to straighten the knee. If one side of the quadriceps is stronger or tighter than the other, it can cause the kneecap to pull to one side and over time become irritated.

There can be many factors that cause a muscle imbalance or weakness on one side of the quadriceps. In most people, the outer aspect of the quadriceps tends to be stronger and tighter than the inner muscle.

Certain postures and leg positions require the outer muscles to work harder and the inside muscles to become less active. Lack of arch support in your feet or simply a physical abnormality of the knee can also place stress on the movement of the patella.

What are the symptoms?

This condition is characterized by pain felt on the inside or behind of the patella with activities that require repetitive bending of the knee. There may be a sensation of crepitus, clicking or grinding and some people report that their knee suddenly gives way. The pain is commonly felt when running, going up and down stairs or when doing squats and is relieved with rest. The pain may start as a small niggle and gradually become worse over time.

How can physiotherapy help?

The first step in effective treatment is to exclude any other conditions and have Physiotherapist confirm the diagnosis. Your Physiotherapist is able to determine which factors are contributing to this condition, which could include poor posture, a lack of arch support in your feet or poor running technique.

Once these factors have been identified, you will be provided with a specific treatment program to best approach your condition. PFP syndrome usually responds quite well to biomechanical analysis and correction of any muscular weakness and imbalance. Having the correct shoes and orthotics can also make a huge difference. There are some short-term treatments, such as patella taping, try needling, trigger point therapy and ultrasound, which may help alleviate symptoms quickly and keep you active while you address the other factors contributing to your pain.

 If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your knee. We have a free knee pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489 398 or click here to fill out our contact form. Please enter your details and tell us what’s going on with your knee. A member of the team can email or post you a copy.

FREE REPORT: “HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET IN ON ALL THE FREE ADVICE CURRENTLY BEING GIVEN AWAY BY OUR BEST PHYSIOS TO PEOPLE WHO WANT TO KNOW HOW TO BRING A FAST END TO THEIR “DAILY, ANNOYING AND NAGGING” KNEE PAIN…BEFORE IT GETS ANY WORSE”!

…Meaning A Better Night’s Sleep, More Energy, Less Worry, And Above All…MORE Freedom To Do Things With LESS PAIN And Less Tension!… And That Would Be Nice, Right?

Yours Free From us here at Apple Physio……..


What is total knee replacement?

Its an orthopaedic procedure where the articular surfaces (end of the bone) of the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) are replaced.

A polyethylene piece is placed between the tibia and femur as a shock absorber.

In about half of cases the patella (kneecap) is also replaced.

Why get one?

The main reason people have a knee replacement is that they have most commonly over a period of time noticed

  • Increased pain at the knee joint that in the latter stages can affect sleep at night time
  • Decreased mobility to the point that they may require use of a walking aid

Outcomes anticipated from a TKR (Total Knee Replacement) are

  • Reduction in pain
  • Increase in Function

The most common cause of this is OA (Osteoarthritis). This is where the cartilage of the joint becomes damaged and is unable to absorb the shock as well as a healthy joint.

Anatomy:

The knee joint is made up of the Femur and Tibia with another joint at the front called the patellofemoral joint (Kneecap) encompassing the patella.

The knee is a modified hinge joint. The main movement is flexion and extension along with small amounts of internal and external rotation.

There is a thin layer of cartilage at the end of the bones and also the shock absorbers in the knee known as the cartilage.

There are large ligaments supporting the knee joint some of which are

  • ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament)
  • PCL (Posterior Cruciate Ligament)
  • MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament)
  • LCL (Lateral Collateral Ligament)

Who is more likely to have a knee replacement?

Risk factors that can increase your chance of a knee replacement are

  • Previous knee surgery (often to remove meniscus)
  • Previous Fracture
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Being Overweight

The Surgery:

The surgery can take about an hour and most frequently is under general anaesthetic.

The actual replacement has 3 parts

  • Femoral Component
  • Tibial Component
  • Polyethlene shock absorbent disc

The most appropriate size and shape of the prosthesis is chosen on a patient by patient basis.

When does Physiotherapy Play a Role?

Pre Surgery:

Physiotherapy can provide you with

  • Exercises to maximise the strength in the muscles pre-operatively
  • Show you the exercises that you will be doing post surgery to ensure that you are aware of the correct technique

Post Surgery:

  • Get you up and moving within 24-48 hours of surgery
  • Strength exercises
  • Balance exercises
  • Gait Re Education
  • Increase ROM (Range of Movement)
  • Decrease Pain

Examples of common exercises post Total Knee Replacement:

  • Ankle movement exercises
  • Knee ROM exercises e.g. heel slide into Knee Flexion/extension
  • Quadricep Strengthening exercises e.g. straight leg raise
  • Hamstring Strengthening exercises e.g. Bridging

Here at Apple Physio all of our team have vast experience dealing with Total Knee Replacements so if you need any advice please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your knee. We have a free knee pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489 398 or click here to fill out our contact form. Please enter your details and tell us what’s going on with your knee. A member of the team can email or post you a copy.

FREE REPORT: “HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET IN ON ALL THE FREE ADVICE CURRENTLY BEING GIVEN AWAY BY OUR BEST PHYSIOS TO PEOPLE WHO WANT TO KNOW HOW TO BRING A FAST END TO THEIR “DAILY, ANNOYING AND NAGGING” KNEE PAIN…BEFORE IT GETS ANY WORSE”!

…Meaning A Better Night’s Sleep, More Energy, Less Worry, And Above All…MORE Freedom To Do Things With LESS PAIN And Less Tension!… And That Would Be Nice, Right?

Yours Free From us here at Apple Physio……..

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


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Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, who want to keep healthy and active.



The Surprising Truth about Knee Osteoarthritis

Sufferers of knee pain know that nothing can kill your optimism for a recovery faster than a diagnosis of Osteoarthritis (OA). Osteoarthritis is often seen as a kind of death sentence for joints. Many people believe that if you have OA your pain will never improve and will only get worse until a joint replacement can be performed. In fact, joint replacements for hip and knee OA are some of the most common and indeed successful operations performed by Orthopedic Surgeons.

At least this has been conventional wisdom for decades. Many of us see our bodies like cars, when a part ‘wears out’ it needs replacing with a new one. The truth is much more complicated, mainly due to our bodies’ incredible ability to adapt and change.

Physiotherapists have always known that the pain and disability that comes with arthritis can be improved with a closely targeted exercise program. In some cases, the pain that is attributed to OA is actually due to another, entirely treatable cause. In other cases, strengthening the musculature around the painful joint can have a significant effect by providing the joint with extra support.

The way we move is often affected negatively by pain and this in itself can create a downward spiral. This is not to say that in some cases, surgery is the best and most effective option to improve your quality of life. Rather that there is a strong case to see a physiotherapists to seek treatment for your knee pain first.

Physiotherapists are highly skilled at identifying exactly what is causing your pain and helping you reach the highest level of function. In fact, a recent study has shown that with targeted exercises, directed by physiotherapists – many patients who were scheduled to have surgery were able to improve their quality of life dramatically, avoiding surgery and getting back to their favourite activities.

While exercise is a very powerful treatment, it’s not that any exercise will take away any pain. To be effective, you will need to have a full assessment and have a personalized treatment program created by your physiotherapist. This can involve identifying weak muscles, limitations in flexibility, finding painful trigger points, restoring movement to stiff joints and providing biomechanical assessment to make a combination of changes that can make a large difference to your pain and activity levels.

Your Physiotherapist can also identify any external factors that may be contributing to your pain. Such as unsupportive footwear, workplace set up etc. Talk to us to see how we can help you manage your osteoarthritis.

If you have any further questions, please feel free to email us at bracknell@applephysio.com

 If you’d like more info on this, and some easy, actionable tips you can use now to start easing your knee. We have a free knee pain guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489 398 or click here to fill out our contact form. Please enter your details and tell us what’s going on with your knee. A member of the team can email or post you a copy.

FREE REPORT: “HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET IN ON ALL THE FREE ADVICE CURRENTLY BEING GIVEN AWAY BY OUR BEST PHYSIOS TO PEOPLE WHO WANT TO KNOW HOW TO BRING A FAST END TO THEIR “DAILY, ANNOYING AND NAGGING” KNEE PAIN…BEFORE IT GETS ANY WORSE”!

…Meaning A Better Night’s Sleep, More Energy, Less Worry, And Above All…MORE Freedom To Do Things With LESS PAIN And Less Tension!… And That Would Be Nice, Right?

Yours Free From us here at Apple Physio……..

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


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Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, who want to keep healthy and active.