Meet the newest members of the Apple Physio Team

We are pleased to introduce you to Mike Davis and Kevin Young who have joined The Apple Physio Team:

Mike Davis

Mike Davis has been qualified for over 18 years and has a wealth of experience in treating sports injuries and spinal (neck and back) pain. He has spent the majority of his time in private practice in London working with some of the top orthopaedic and spinal consultants in the UK.

He is a keen runner and as a consequence has a particular interest in running injuries and running based rehabilitation. His other strong interest is in shoulder pain and shoulder rehabilitation.  He uses a wide variety of treatment skills ranging from Acupuncture to joint manipulation plus massage and exercise therapy to alleviate and resolve symptoms such as pain and stiffness .

Mike believes strongly that it is essential not just to treat and resolve the patient’s symptoms-e.g pain, stiffness, swelling but also to analyse and correct their faulty posture and movement patterns. His experience in treating spinal conditions allied with his knowledge of the current evidence based research on the most effective exercises for spinal pain will give patients the best possible opportunity to gain strong healthy pain free spines.  

For anyone with running injuries Mike can undertake a detailed biomechanical analysis of your running technique which often is one the causative factors leading to injury. With expert analysis Mike can help fine tune and improve your running pattern to make you a more efficient runner and ultimately less vulnerable to re-injury.

For those looking to lose weight who are unsure of how or where to start Mike can also offer advice based on the current scientific research on nutrition and he can dispel  lots of common myths associated with weight loss and provide the most effective strategies for long term gradual weight loss and improved general health and conditioning.

Kevin Young

                                                                      

He has worked in sports for 25 years.  He has worked closely with many local rugby teams, American Football players and professional boxers. 

He started to use video & gait analysis, using treadmills and on-track/field facilities to diagnose and rectify lower limb and foot biomechanical problems.  

Kevin has also achieved a BSc (Hons) in Traditional Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture and Diploma in Tui Na (Chinese Medical Massage) as well as a MSC in lower limb musculo-skeletal studies specializing in lower limb injuries, biomechanics and gait analysis.

He also is a lecturer in Anatomy, Structural diagnosis and Tui Na massage at College of Integrated Chinese Medicine Reading as well as being a visiting lecturer in Acupuncture, biomechanics and running & gait analysis at Cardiff Met University (Master’s program) and at Glyndwr University (Bachelor of Science) in Wrexham

Kevin uses Eastern and Western diagnosis and treatments to offer patients a different take on treating musculo-skeletal injuries.

Kevin will working at our Windsor clinic. As well as treating all musculoskeletal conditions Kevin will also be offering Eastern and Western acupuncture as well as gait analysis and customised orthotics. 

Contact our front Desk teams on 01344 489398 or 01753 866274 to book your assessment with Mike and Kevin now.

Sports Injury Focus – Shin Splints

Signs and Symptoms:

Pain on the inside of the shin bone – usually appears gradually and gets worse the more running or waking on a hard surface that you do. Excessive walking in poor fitting shoes ( like flip flops) can sometimes also lead to shin splints.

* Week 1 

Complete rest is advised for the athlete.
Speak to the GP about anti-inflammatories and apply ice regularly to the damaged shinbone.

In this phase it’s important to check trainers for “wear” and loss of support. Also, consider custom orthotics that are proven to reduce the effects of shin splints and limit pain during exercise.

Athlete can cycle, swim, cross trainer and rowing machine to maintain CV fitness. Running is to be avoided at all costs.

From a Physio point of view – deep massage of the calf and Achilles muscles is urgent as is stretching of both. Sometimes strapping can be of help. Consider dry needling as a treatment modality as well.

* Week 2 

Continue with ice and rest from cycling or running. 

Swimming is encouraged and the rower is also possible and unlikely to reproduce any pain in the shin. If it does, stop. 

Continue with gluteal and core exercises and stretching in the gym. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the whole leg is vital and will continue x3 daily, immediately followed by passive and active stretching. 

* Week 3 

Consider gradual return to running. Note: Treadmill running is advised first due to less impact. All other fitness options are continued and core/pilates is increased.

From a Physio point of view – athlete continues to receive deep tissue massage, PNF stretching and hands on work to the leg and also the lower back region as a prophylaxis.

* Week 4 

Continue with ice.

Insert custom orthotics and begin gradual return to pre-injury activity.

Athlete will continue to apply ice immediately after any running for at least 6 weeks.

Core and pilates exercises maintained, as is all strength and flexibility work to the surrounding muscle groups.

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the calf muscle and surrounding muscles continues for approximately 2-3 weeks.

Review of recovery: 

Complete rest from running needed early on.

Stretch and massaging of calf and Achilles is pivotal to the successful recovery. As is doing the right core, Pilates and gluteal strength and control exercises.

Secret Tip(s): 

Check your trainers and change them every 3 months, consider custom foot orthotics and ice packs is the best thing that you can be doing to help your self with shin splints.

You must also be doing regular core control and back strength exercises, too. Let your Physio do everything else.

Do not be fooled by the absence of pain when you rest. Shin Splints are likely to only be painful in a weight-bearing situation (such as running or excessive walking).

Note: Return to running progressively and start with treadmill –> grass –> sand –> road.

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


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Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus – Runners’ Knee ( ITB Friction Syndrome)

Signs and Symptoms:

Signs & Symptoms of Runners’ Knee include burning sensation/pain that comes on gradually on the outside of the knee. Common in cyclists and runners. Often confusing as there is no major incident or trauma, yet the pain and or burning comes on gradually and appears to get worse. 

* Week 1 

Ice is vital. As is rest. 

Walking is fine and swimming is great too. With this kind of injury, maintaining flexibility and core strength, is important. 

From a Physio point of view – I’d be working on deep tissue massage of the tensioners of the IT Band(The muscles at the top of the hip) as well as stretching the band, quads and hip region. 

It’s also possible that the Athlete’s “back” will have stiffened so I’d be working to loosen that area too. It’s really important for the Athlete to be working on strength work of the Gluteal muscles and the core stability muscles. 

* Week 2 

Continue with ice and rest from cycling or running. 

Swimming is encouraged and the rower is also possible and unlikely to reproduce any pain on the out-side of the band. If it does, stop. 

Continue with gluteal and core exercises and stretching in the gym. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage of the whole leg is vital and will continue x3 daily, immediately followed by passive and active stretching. 

* Week 3 

Cycling and or running will be able to be introduced in this phase, providing the athlete has followed the treatment plan noted above. 

Gentle, half pace jogging is introduced and cycling (both on the flat). Athlete should not be expecting to feel any burning sensation. Fatigue and stiffness is okay. 

From a Physio point of view – deep therapeutic massage continues as does stretching. Increase gluteal and core exercise and begin re-introduction to 3/4 level activity and or practice. Ice remains important after every session (use heat before). 

* Week 4 

Athlete steps up to training. Sneakers are checked and or orthotics applied to footwear to re-correct the position of the foot. 

From a Physio point of view – massage and stretching continue for at least 2-3 weeks and athlete continues working on core stability and gluteal strength and control exercises. More functional baed exercises are included as well as good hip and knee control against gravity.

Review of recovery: 

Complete rest needed early on – just until the pain settles

Stretch and massaging is pivotal to the successful recovery. As is doing the right core, gluteal exercises and functional rehab exercises. Most times the issues are related to biomechanics and this must be corrected or you’ll just be putting a band aid on the problem.

Secret Tip(s): 

Check your sneakers and change them every 3 months, consider custom foot orthotics and ice packs are the best thing that you can be doing to help your self.  Remember your compliance with your home exercises!

Let your Physiotherapist do everything else. 

Do not be fooled by the absence of pain when you rest. The IT Band is only painful in a weight-bearing situation (such as running) or cycling due to excessive over use. 

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.

Sports Injury Focus: Knee Ligament

Signs and symptoms: 

Athlete likely to have landed awkwardly, twisted, or fallen causing pain, stiffness and immediate swelling of the knee joint, often on the inside. 

* Week 1 

Immediate ice, compression and elevation of the injured knee. Begin gentle walking ASAP. Strapping

Often 3-4 days post injury. 

Note: it is expected (and okay) to be painful. However, straight line walking only. 

None whatsoever twisting or turning of the knee joint can be tolerated in week 1. 

Swimming is encouraged when possible and if pain allows (Tip: Athletes will often use a float between the legs to keep the knee straight and limit pain). 

From a Physio point of view – deep friction massage and very gentle stretching and massage would begin after just 4-5 days. 

* Week 2 

Very gentle (but prolonged) walking on the flat is vital and is to be encouraged. Towards the end of week 2, the goal will be for gentle jogging on a treadmill. 

Swimming continues (not breast stroke), cycling and cross trainers are all ok. 

From a Physio point of view – massage continues of damaged knee ligaments and of the quads, ham- string and calf muscles. Specific quad and gluteal muscle activation is essential

Stretching of all muscle groups is a must and balance work is now added for both legs. 

* Week 3 

Exercise and CV work is increased. 

Straight line running is picked up and the athlete will aim to be at three quarter pace by the end of this phase. 

Slowly, but surely, uneven surfaces are introduced and twisting and turning begins to be allowed. 

From a Physio point of view – all deep massage work continues, muscles and knee joint are stretched to max and proprioception exercises are now top priority along with full movement of the knee joint. 

* Week 4 

Athlete returns to training and possibly performance. CV work increase and continues. 

From a Physio point of view – all massage treatment and stretching continues for approximately 3-4 weeks and athlete pays attention to strength and proprioception exercises. 

Review of recovery: 

Take it very easy early on. But in the case of nearly all knee ligament sprains, too much rest will be harmful. 

Stretch and mobilise the injury at just the right time and no knee ligament injury can ever recover fully with prolonged rest. 

Secret Tip(s): 

Too much rest in the first few weeks will increase the likelihood of re-injury and a recovery plateau will occur. 

No breast stroke in the swimming pool. 

Do not be fooled by lack of pain when walking straight – twisting and turning “pain free” must be achievable. 

Note: It’s not uncommon for knee sprains to feel not much better even 6 weeks down the line. And it’s often because of too much rest in the first few weeks. 

Stay off the beach and avoid uneven woods/hilly areas when running, for at least 3 months post knee injury. 

Don’t be fooled by the lack of pain after two weeks either. 

It does not mean you are fit to play or run and if you haven’t followed all of the Protocol listed above, you will damage the ligament again sometime soon – often when you least expect it on an uneven surface.

If you’d like more info on this, and some further easy, actionable tips on other sports injuries too. We have a free guide that we can send you. Connect with us on 01344 489398 or email us on bracknell@applephysio.com and tell us what’s going on. 

A member of the team can take your details and we can email you a copy.

About the Author: Leslie Abrahams and the Apple Physio team


fullsizeoutput_39a3

Leslie is a Physio, Pilates Educator and Rehab Specialist who has a special interest in Spinal Treatments, lower limb injuries, and has vast experience dealing with patients post injury or surgery. Every week, for over 20 years, 100’s of people aged 30-64+ have consulted the Apple Physio team looking for answers to concerning questions about, and for, a fast end to their health worries and physical pains and stiffness.

 Leslie is a Master Trainer for the world renowned Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute(APPI). He is regular key note speaker at conferences and travels internationally to present on modified exercise for rehabilitation. Leslie is the Director of Apple Physio Clinics situated in Bracknell and Windsor. Berkshire’s Specialist Private Physiotherapy Practice for People in their 30’s. 40’s, 50’s and 60’s and above, who want to keep healthy and active.